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Author Topic: Introducing a female Dog  (Read 14205 times)
Mali Mom Ireland
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« on: November 06, 2008, 12:25:10 AM »

Hi Everyone,

I have 2 Male Alaskan Malamutes (2yrs) both from the same litter.
There are some small dominance issues at present, one of them is neutered but recently he is trying to challenge the other.
Generally I don't interfere when they do fight and they sort it out themselves fairly quickly.
Is there anything I can do to encourage top dog or should I have the other neutered. Huh

Also down the line, I would like to get a female dog, I was thinking an Akita rather than a Malamute.
Can you let me know what you all think :
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maxsmom
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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2008, 02:56:16 AM »

Dominance issues are going to happen, castrated or not.  My alpha is castrated, my second is castrated and my lowest on the totem pole is my intact male wolfhound.  I don't believe in castration of male dogs, but that is just my personal opinion.

I also don't believe you can "create" an alpha dog.  You may do everything first with them, but that does not make them alpha.  It may make them your favorite, but it does not make the other dogs see them as alpha.  Max is my largest and tallest dog.  Since his head is usually the closest to me, he usually gets his treats, food, etc. first.  He is my bottom of the pack, in terms of hierarchy.  Dominance is 90% mental and 10% physical, in my opinion.  Cody does not throw his weight around, growling, challenging, etc.  In fact he has never bitten another dog in my house, other than to slam ChiChi a few times, just to teach her to leave him alone, when he doesn't want to play.  Even then, there was not a mark on her.  He used only enough force to put her on the floor and hold her, or to grab her paw, when she slapped him with it and hold it until she submitted. 

As far as introducing a female dog, you need to make sure that the dog you get, fits.  Every female is not going to fit into every all male pack.  Every male is not going to NOT fit into every all male pack.  When I got Jake, I already had Cody and Max and we had no issues with fighting or aggression.  Prior to Jake, I had tried to introduce female dogs, as I thought that would be an easier addition.  Wrong.  Cody was fine with them, meeting outside or off property, but would not allow them into the house.  It just wasn't happening.  I know now that it was the dogs and not the sex, as ChiChi was readily accepted into the pack, from day one.
Kathy
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Max  2 Irish Wolfhound
Jake  2 Great Pyrenees
Cody   3 Tibetan Mastiff
ChiChi 1.5 Caucasian Ovcharka
John and Nicki Maine Coon cats
Saint and Mal mom
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2008, 08:45:50 AM »

I agree STRONGLY with the 90% attitude, 10% physical figure given here in figuring out the "dominant" dog. The dominant dog in any pack is the one that doesn't appear to be so dominant. They are often the ones that don't throw their weight around, that aren't constantly going around growling and snappig at other dogs. The "alpha" dogs don't need to PROVE their position, they simply ARE alpha, and it has nothing to do with how the humans treat them or don't treat them. Except that humans can interfere with this heirarchy, which usually has a negative and not a positive effect.

With my Alaskan Malamute female, who is older than my Saint Bernard female, the pecking order was not so apparent to me. I assumed that since my Mal was older and had lived here first and was a more dominant type of dog, she was the head dog. I was wrong. My Saint is EXTREMELY tolerant and patient with Zoey my Mal, even to the point of letting her take food or toys away from her. But when Dolly my Saint makes up her mind that Zoey has stepped over her boundaries too far, Dolly lets her know, and there is NO questioning that position by Zoey when Dolly does this.

My other bit of information is that if you think Malamutes are dominant and a bit dog aggressive, just wait til you study Akitas. DO YOUR HOMEWORK ON THIS BREED! Akitas are much more dog than a Mal is. They are more aggressive in many ways than a Mal will ever be. I assumed they were quite similar in temperaments too and very nearly ended up owning a Mal and Akita rather than my Mal and my Saint. I am glad I didn't make that decision of getting an Akita then because I would not have been ready for one. Study, study, study the Akita breed if you decide to get one. Get your hands on every book, talk to breeders, and have a trainer picked out if you do get an Akita.
 
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Marissa

Zoey- Alaskan Malamute, 4 years
Dolly, CGC- Saint Bernard, 4 years
Foster mom to Clarence- Basset Hound, 5 years

"To be loved by...any animal should fill us with awe-for we have not deserved it."
Tonda
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2008, 09:27:43 AM »

I agree STRONGLY with the 90% attitude, 10% physical figure given here in figuring out the "dominant" dog.


Yep. Hence my mother's 12 lb. Chihuahua/Boston has ruled over Rotties, Pits, Staffies and now my Mastiffs.
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LuvmyMal
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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2008, 01:34:48 PM »

I am very partial to malamutes, yes I strongly agree study Akitas first, I was going to get one then decided on another malamute. Don't get me wrong they are wonderful dogs, but if dominance and aggression is an issues definitely study them and breeders, I have met some of the nicest and friendliest Akitas then also met some that don't tolerate any other dogs (then again, most of that is breeding and owners) Good luck!

Edited to add...Same sex agression is very relevant in malamutes, the breeder I got adak from will not sell two dogs of the same sex to anyone, males are more dominant than females, right now at the age of 2 they are going through pack order, but to answer, yes neutering the other male may help.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2008, 01:36:23 PM by LuvmyMal » Logged
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