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Author Topic: Bite Inhibition  (Read 3640 times)
GoofyNewfie
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« on: December 05, 2008, 10:37:40 AM »

So I am at my husband's band practice, and the singer, who I believe watches too much Dog Whisperer, proceeds to tell me I have no control of my dog "Well, he bites at peoples hands."

My apologies: It's late and I need to stop hitting reply with quote because I inadvertantly hit "modify" instead,  right beside that button, and wiped out most of your post Cry So sorry Undecided That's twice now in less than a month I've done that Sad
« Last Edit: December 06, 2008, 08:29:26 PM by k9kooky » Logged

Diesel, 6 month old Newf.
Tonda
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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2008, 11:01:15 AM »

Sounds like hubby’s band mate is over-reacting a bit (and I’m a bit Dog Whisper fan; I’d say 80% of what he does and says is pretty much what my family has always done, it’s just common sense).

5 months is not too late, but it's verging on it IMO. Bite inhibition is something they really only learn as pups, once they hit adolescence it’s VERY hard to instill. By 5 months he really shouldn’t be putting his teeth on people still. Yes, he’s teething, but he must know that people are simply not acceptable chew toys.

It sounds like you’d got a good start on it though, so if you just REALLY reinforce it, you’ll probably be fine.
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lins_saving_grace
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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2008, 01:16:49 PM »

it's a natural instinct, especially at such a young age.  Plus, like people babies, they like to stick things in their mouths.  he just needs repetition in your discouragment of this.  It's not an acceptable behavior, especially since at 1 year old he could probably really injure someone. 
If this guy watches so much Dog Whisperer he would know not to approach a dog he's never met while either of them is in an excited state.  Even friendly and more mellow breeds can sense that and react to it.
sounds like you are on the right track and staying up on the no biting rule you've set.  stick to it and it should disappear in time.
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People Whisperer
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« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2008, 02:48:14 PM »

It sounds like you are doing a great job with your pup!  Smiley
I don't think it's abnormal for a pup to gently grab of hands from happiness. Lily is 2.5 and still does it when her and hubby play their "weird" games  Cheesy Roll Eyes 
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I don't suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute of it Smiley

sc.trojans
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« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2008, 05:46:21 PM »


As most others have already stated, no 5 months is not too old and in fact, mouthing would naturally be at its peak right about now.  It is not unusual at all and perfectly normal - he is still a baby and just in teething.

Since your post was titled "bite inhibition" I think it is an important point - bite inhibition as you already know is learning the strength of his mouth and how to use it properly - a puppy does not come into the world naturally understanding this and it only comes from practice, on a variety of objects, to learn.  It is our job to teach a puppy what is appropriate to put his mouth on and what is not, but it is even more important to ensure that puppy has experienced putting his teeth on human flesh and understands the right strenght - or gentleness .  This is right where your puppy is, so it is less about suppressing this behavior right now and more about teaching that it is hurtful, or too strong on human skin.

Mouthing, as common as it is, also varies by breed.  I am one who believes strongly that mouthing is a bigger concern in some breeds than others.  Those breeds with functions that are naturally supposed to be using their mouths, are usually the most mouthy of course.  While I understand wanting to strongly teach a herding dog for example not to use their mouth (that IS a problem in that job), it is ridiculous to expect a golden retriever to NOT use their mouth - its instinct for them and a natural behavior for life.

You have one such breed - newfies often use their mouths to pull dingy pulls and rescue batons in their rescue work - to me, learning the strength of his mouth and then putting his mouth to good work by giving him batons and tuffy toys to carry/hold is a great outlet and good for teaching what to put his mouth on.....a matter or "re-directing" the behavior...not "suppressing" it in my view.


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GoofyNewfie
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« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2008, 08:11:58 PM »

Thanks guys, all said is what I felt like saying, but didn't, because I'm just not a clever come-back queen, lol. I also wanted to double check first, in case I was wrong... Smiley

This puppy is my first dog, my first personal responsibility with a heart beat. It's totally thrilling, and comes with a lot of "am I doing this right?". I spend so much time researching methods and trying my best, so blatant criticism was met with a bit of worry and sensitivity  Undecided

I was telling this story to a friend of mine who is a mother, and she told me to just wait till someone tells me something like this about my skin kid  Shocked Shocked I bet!
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Diesel, 6 month old Newf.
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« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2008, 01:49:27 AM »

Thanks guys, all said is what I felt like saying, but didn't, because I'm just not a clever come-back queen, lol. I also wanted to double check first, in case I was wrong... Smiley

This puppy is my first dog, my first personal responsibility with a heart beat. It's totally thrilling, and comes with a lot of "am I doing this right?". I spend so much time researching methods and trying my best, so blatant criticism was met with a bit of worry and sensitivity  Undecided

I was telling this story to a friend of mine who is a mother, and she told me to just wait till someone tells me something like this about my skin kid  Shocked Shocked I bet!


Does he have pets or kids? Tell him he's no dog whisperer and until he has formulated the "perfect non-biting non-chewing" puppy to shove his microphone where the sun don't shine.

I'm on the same boat with you, although my pup is younger than yours. You do the best you can to provide for them and train them, and I think we're always going to question ourselves if we're "doing it right". I lost my temper and yelled because Koda wouldn't stop barking...I'm thinking to myself..."I wonder if any of the BPOers yell at their dogs". LOL. Roll Eyes I did read your original post, and I'm no dog expert but I think you're doing a mighty fine job Smiley
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GoofyNewfie
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2008, 11:27:35 AM »

Quote
I lost my temper and yelled because Koda wouldn't stop barking...I'm thinking to myself..."I wonder if any of the BPOers yell at their dogs". LOL. Roll Eyes

LMAO-totally!!!

Well, I had a nice and satisfying moment, at this week's jam, there were new musicians/guests who had a conversation about how insanely well-behaved our dog is. hohum! I probably had a ear-to-ear I-told-you-so grin. Lol, I'm so immature.  Roll Eyes
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Diesel, 6 month old Newf.
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