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Author Topic: anyone else have a Nyak's Kennels malamute from Magnolia Texas?  (Read 12463 times)
opheliaswings
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« on: October 29, 2005, 03:03:22 AM »

Hi, I'm new to the forum and I had seen a few posts about some of the people on this forum having Mal pups from a Kennel called Nyak's kennels located in Magnolia, Texas outside of Houston. I was just curious to find out some information from anyone that has a puppy from this breeder. We also have one that is about 8 months old now and we've had a lot of problems with her. I can't seem to figure out why everyone else has had such good luck with puppies from this breeder. She has a great personality, but we had a horrible time housebreaking her and she's destroyed thousands of dollars worth of furniture. Even while be supervised in the house she has been destructive. I am just curious to find out why we have had a run of bad luck with our puppy when it seems as though everyone else has had a great experience dealing with these puppies. Thanks for the advice.
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2005, 07:51:30 AM »

I know nothing about  Nyak's Kennels, but am wishing you good luck in getting your girl tamed.  I know how frustrating it is to try to trace back to find the basis of a problem.  Hopefully, she'll start growing up and settling down soon! Wink
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2005, 01:05:48 PM »

Malamutes are notorious for their independence, as well as their aloofness, and intelligence.
If they get away with something once they will test you, again and again.
You noted that she destroyed things even when supervised.
Don't let your dog get away with anything!
The attention that you pay to her when she has this behavior is reinforcement for that behavior.
She wants your attention, and when you react, she will continue that behavior.
Has she been to obedience training? Does she have issues with other animals or people?
Is she trained to a crate? Is this your first puppy?
It is sometimes too easy to question a breeder about the behavior issues without looking into the work that is required to make a 'Great' dog "Good".
I don't want you to feel that I'm being judgemental, but when you bring a dog into your home you have to be ready to be the 'teacher', and set the 'Rules of Behavior' in your classroom.
A dog takes a place in our heart the moment we bring it home, it becomes a part of our soul when it listens and responds to us, it becomes our heart and soul when it anticipates, and knows our expectations.
I think you need to spend some time with her, and find out what she needs from you.
John
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2005, 11:04:38 PM »

I agree with you both.  Before you adopt a nordic breed (and trust me, I should have done this as well, and I didn't)  you really need to look into the basic characteristic s of the dog and their temperment before you decide on adopting one.  I genuinely and naively thought that Nanook would be like all the other dogs I've owned in the past.  Huge mistake.  Huskies and Mals require ALOT of physical exercise - they get bored very quickly.  For the most part, they enjoy being in the house in short intervals...re alize, its in their blood to run, and run, and run some more...being cooped up in the house, even for a little while, isn't their idea of fun.  So, in response, its not surprising that your Mal releases his energy on your furniture.

Obedience classes would be a good start.  Remember though, you'll need ALOT of working with him, because with any Nordic breed, you have to be consistent with the teaching.  I've heard people say they're "untrainable" - no dog is untrainable - you just need a little more patience with these guys.

What John said was absolutely right.  They're very independent... Nanook thinks he doesn't need me at all...he just does his own thing really, he's perfectly content on his own, doing his own thing, and he doesn't need me to entertain him.  Of course, he's like a 2 year old and ends up getting into mounds of trouble if I don't watch him.

Also, if you have a yard (which I'm hoping you do) you really need to puppyproof the fence.  They're master escape artists, and like I said before, they get bored...and when they get bored, they might try to figure out a way to get out.

Don't give up on him.  These are some of the most magnificent and rewarding dogs to have.  And they have such big hearts too  Wink  Just alot of energy to go along with it!

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opheliaswings
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2005, 09:46:45 AM »

Hi Everyone, thanks for the great replys. We have had Glacier since she was six weeks old and it's been nothing but an up hill battle with her. I have had dogs before, even a wolf hybrid, but she's been very hard to deal with. We couldn't get her housebroken until she was 7 months old. Even with constant supervision and praise she just kept going in the house. I was told by the trainer at work that she's going through her second teething stage, and well between the first one and this one she's wrecked thousands of dollars worth of carpet and antique furniture in my future inlaws home. I feel horrible having the dog destroying everything and feeling like I am not a good enough owner. We have her in a basic obedience class right now. A lot of the commands she already knows but we're trying to work with her. We are wanting to get a crate for her, but with her being as big as she is with bills and all we're having a hard time being able to drop $200 on a crate right now. She is 8 months old and already weighs almost 90 lbs, we were told by the breeder that she would easily reach 120 lbs at maturity. We have noticed other dog aggression, especially towards females. Through my research I have found that it is pretty normal for mals to have aggression towards other dogs, especially of the same sex. We also have a 3 year old rhodisian ridgeback mix and they get along great. She is very intellegent and michevious and it's very hard to keep up with her all the time. Just friday she chewed about a 4" hunk off the corner of a solid 1" thick oak coffee table in 20 mins! We have difficulty keeping toys because the older male is a heavy duty chewer and he'll go through most anything in mins. She likes soft squeeky toys versus the hard rubber or plastic ones, so it's very hard for us to be able to afford to replace $10 toys left and right. We've pretty much come to the end of the road that if we can't get a crate and get her to stop destroying everything that we are going to have to place her with someone else. Living in Texas has been extremely hard on her as well, with the weather it's hard for us to be able to get her out and exercise her without the threat of heat stroke. As far as the breeder goes we didn't have much luck getting help when I was very frustrated and at my witts end with the dog. She pretty much told us to deal with it or bring the dog back. I'm sorry but after paying $700 for the dog I expected a little more help out of the situation. So anyways, I do appreciate all of the great advice, if anyone can give me any other suggestions I would greatly appreciate it.  Thanks a ton!

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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2005, 10:28:48 AM »

This is why I will NEVER own another girl dog.  Too high maintenance Wink  Seriously I have never had problems with my boys like I have with my girl, and she's the smallest dog we have.  My 160 pound Dane and my 70 pound Chinook (Another sled dog breed although very different personality wise from the Nordics), were nothing compared to my 30 pound English Setter.  At 3 months old she chewed through her crate, then through the house.  We found her in the backyard when we came home from a trip to the grocery store.  She's constantly testing authority, she's SO intelligent she's dangerous.  She knows enough to act dumb Wink  She knows all the obedience commands, but she doesn't do them if she doesn't feel like it.  I feel like I can never enjoy her, it's always a battle with her.  My boys will do anything they can to make you happy.  She's a PIA.   She's my fiance's dog though.  And he loves her to death although I can't imagine WHY!  She is very dog aggressive towards females that are over 6 months and she isn't too happy having intact males around either.  She's just the ultimate bitch.

Have you tried kong toys for the chewing?  My Dane goes through giant tennis balls in about 3 minutes but I dropped the $10 on a Kong Ball and he can't destroy it. Wink

Ang
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« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2005, 11:34:23 AM »

Ang,
I agree with you that females are more high maintenance.
A male goes out into his 'space' and pees on everyting. Says to himself, "OK, I've marked everything that is mine!" And goes into 'Siesta' mode.
A female comes along, takes a sniff, and says, "I'll deal with that issue later!"
Dogs lives are based on a 'Matriarchal' Society.
The female rules, and the males take their place until they are needed.
It's not unlike our own society when you think about it.
Behind every good man, stands a great woman.
That is why I prefer female dogs!
They make sure that other dogs respect their 'space'!
Just my humble opinion.
John

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« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2005, 11:36:10 AM »

There's already one high maintenance bit** in my house.  I hate having to deal with a furry one Wink
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2005, 10:38:20 AM »

I have 2 female malamutes, both are now altered. From my experience with them and a husky I had years ago I can tell you that each dog is completely different. Tonka, my 9 month old was the perfect puppy, we could leave her for hours in the house while we went shopping, out to dinner or out for the afternoon, no problem, she would sit on the couch or her cooler bed and sleep or chew on Kongs. Then a long came Nala now 3 months old ( I had both of my girls fixed at an early age due to aggression). Mals tend to be very aggressive if not altered that goes for males and females but mostly the females, I even noticed a bit of an attitude with little Nala towards Tonka that I had to quickly stop and remind her that I was the main B**** and put her in her place this was at 10 weeks old. That is when I decided time to fix her, she was spayed on Friday. Tonka hikes on the weekends and goes to the doggy park and Nala will do the same. Right now they both run at the park or the neighborhood or both depending on how the days before were with weather.  Tonka finally showed her true colors and ate the coffee table so she is now back in her playpen when we leave the house and Nala is crated. Nala has been pure heck on wheels since Friday and so far chewed on my cell phone, the cordless, and shoes, well not to mention the spray bottle that she chewed up last night (I was using that to correct her) I know it is because she is bored but she still goes to time out which is the dark bathroom with nothing to do or look at, everything is removed and she is placed in there until I feel she is ready to come out. I know you have a big mal but try pening her to the floor even if you have to lie on top of her until she calms down ALWAYS make sure she looks you directly in the eyes and keep going until she does if she strays then she will think she is the ALPHA, YOU are always the ALPHA in the house.  When the weather cools down or early in the morning or right before sundown run her, mine are inside during the day and then get to play outside when we come home. Mals are wonderful and brilliant creatures, but they can also be very sneaky and stubborn and will test you numerous times, keep working with her and it will get better. If you have any other questions please feel free to pm me.
Tasha, Tonka, and Nala
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anapap
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« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2005, 10:37:15 PM »

I agree, I don't think this is an issue with the dog's breeding.  Malamutes are stubborn, or to be PC, I guess I should write they are independent  Wink.  Did the breeder not stress this?  Our breeder made it very clear that a Malamute is not the dog to get if you are looking for a dog that will gladly obey you.  The breeders spent over 4 hours telling us all about the breed and lent us several books, we hadn't already read, to better prepare us. After our first 4 hour visit, we met for another 3 hours to address additional concerns and to go over a few things.  They have been a constant source of help and support and sold us a truly wonderful dog. 

Like someone wrote, Mals are also very active so you are probably gonna have to find something to stimulate the little girl mentally and physically.  I'm from Houston, so I know how hard that can be due to our heat. 

Regardless, they are a very smart breed and if you are very consistent, you should have less trouble training your baby to be more mannerful in the house.  There really is no reason why your puppy would destroy anything with you in the home.  You just have to redirect her attention to an object that is appropriate to chew on.  I don't like giving bones, but maybe you can try to give her a bone to chew on.  I think with consistent, positive training, and a lot of patience (this is still a baby and will be for the next year) you should have a wonderful companion. 

In regard to housebreaking, 8 months is not that long at all.  Man, I wish toy dogs were that easy!  I remember our Mal having to pee every 20 minutes for a few months.

Magnolia is really close to Houston, so why don't you stop by a local dog show.  They have them all the time in Houston, Navasota, and Bryan.  I'm sure the Mal breeders would be more than willing to give you extra tips.

If you really can't handle her, I'm sure the breeder would refund your money. 

PS: There are some really great books out there.  Have you read anything to address your problems?  I think Patricia McConnell and Jean Davidson have some wonderful books out there. 
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« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2005, 10:41:10 PM »

I have a 2 year old male from Nyak Kennels, he is a very well behaved member of our family. However between 8 and 12 months old he held true to the age(teenager) and he would try to see just what he could get away with. But they do out grow that stage. You have to let them know who is boss. Be very consistant with your disapline. If you let them do something once and get away with it they will continue to do these things over and over. They also have to have things to keep them simulated mentally. Try the kong toys, rope for tug-o-war, the treat balls that they have to figure out how to get the treats out.
These dogs are very smart, and they can be alot of fun.
Be patient, consistant, and your little girl will grow up to be a loving wonderful part of your family. 
Plus if you have questions Drema is a wonderful breeder and will help you find out the answers if she doen't already know the answer.
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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2005, 07:34:09 PM »

First, Victor is beautiful! But back to the post, my girls are now 11 mos and almost 5 mos. and both breeders call me weekly if they don't get an update on them. The 1st breeder told me the bad things first then the good second. I call her when I have a discipline question on either dog. Tonka (11mos) has successfully completed puppy obedience and Nala(5mos on 12/26) will finish in a few weeks they can both leave it on command and are learning to waive at visitors unless asked for a hug. They also both run daily even in the dark around the neighborhood. They take work, but it all pays off when you get your snuggle at night in the winter! Wink I can try to help you the best I can if you ever want you can pm me or just post here and I will answer to the best of my knowledge.
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2006, 12:17:35 PM »

Hello. I have a female Malamute from Nyak Kennels. I got her when she was 10 weeks old. She has been a bit difficult to housebreak and she likes nothing better than to munch on rugs! She will occasionally taste the baseboards, too. But don't lose heart or give up!  My Matzie now housebroken, crate trained, and a loving, comical, sweet natured girl. We celebrated Matzie's 1st birthday this month. Have you tried those rubberized chew toys, rawhide chews, Nylabone, or other indestructible toys? I have to keep Matzie well supplied with those things...stuff she can't chew through...or she will find her own things to chew on. But I think most big dogs do that.  I believe the thing that helped housebreak her the most was crate training. She won't EVER go in her crate, and when she is out of the crate, I am there.  Also, you could try leash bonding. Get a 6' leash with a loop handle. Put the loop around your ankle and then your dog is never more than 6' away from you. We have ceased that process but Matzie still is usually where I am...As for chewing on furniture, carpet, etc., try Apple Bitters spray. It doesn't seem to stain and must taste terrible...Mat zie licked a baseboard where I sprayed it and foamed at the mouth for a long time. but she leaves the baseboards alone now.  Madeleine Longworth
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2006, 12:55:56 PM »

People who go into purchasing a dog of any kind need to do their homework.  Nordic breeds in general are very intelligent but have their own agenda about things and need some serious work.  They were bred for pulling and other heavy duty work.  They are not meant to be your average lazy housedog by any means. 

What you have Seraph Wolf
is typical malumute/husky behavior.  You have to be the boss.  I'm not trying to be mean or rude, but this breed is not one to be taken lightly-you can't blame the breeder for a dog's behavior that is typical to the breed.  Kennels are really a must for these breeds when you are away from home, for their safety and your sanity.  If you can't put the money down for one, then what happens if she gets a chunk of wood caught in her throat/stomach/intestines and it has to be surgically removed.  That would cost a whole lot more.  Your loosing more money in not getting one too it seems.  I have had a couple of nordic breeds before and loved them dearly.  One did not potty train until she was a year old.  No joke and we take no credit for it either-one day it just clicked for her.  We just kept taking her out, praising her efforts when it happened and kept her on paper on the linoleum when she was inside and did not fuss when she had an accident while we were gone.  She would go in her kennel too like it was nothing.  She didn't care.  She also ate things even with bitter apple on them-baseboards especially.  She would always be told no and then given a proper chew toy which she then demolished!  They are strong chewers: either you are going to buy the things they need to chew on that are appropriate or you are going to lose items all over your house and may end up with a very sick puppy one day.  When my girl hit a year old, she was the best dang dog ever!  I wish I still had her with me.

I actually kept my other one 'tied' by leash to me when I was home-long leash on, always taken where I went in the house by it.  He went where I did and learned to behave quite well.  He wasn't able to get into trouble since I was always watching and he learned some of his obedience quicker since I used it consistently/constantly while he was next to me.  Plus he always had my attention.  He also be sprayed with vinegar/water mix if he was caught starting to chew something bad, and then immediately given one of his toys to have instead.  When I knew he was pretty good about not chewing, I kept the leash on, but let him stay in rooms by himself for short periods.  Always with his toys around him and bitter apple sprayed on furniture legs and baseboards.   He turned out just fine.  But I was consistent, watchful and understanding of what dogs like their breeds need....

I hope you can work it out.  It'll take a while, but they are worth it in the end.  They mostly end up very loyal to their owners. 
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« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2006, 07:05:27 PM »

My oldest just turned 1 yr. and she is my big baby. I agree with keeping them crated, Nala my 6 mos old loves her house, all I have to say is "Nala go to your house" and she is right there no problem. They take a lot of work and patience, but it is paying off so well, they sleep in the room with us at night out of a crate but with the door closed and nothing is to be in their reach. They are sleeping all night long and sometimes will get up at 6:00 on the weekends to go potty then back to cuddle time in the bed. I love my girls, but it took a lot to get them where they are now and I know it will take even more. Nala is hitting the teenage stage and listens when she wants, they are always on Maltime.
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