Author Topic: Oh wow I never expected THIS  (Read 5726 times)

Offline CadillacQueen

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Oh wow I never expected THIS
« on: November 06, 2008, 09:27:08 am »
Remember that rescue Dane I had problems with, with going to the toilet inside? Yeah, we're okay with that now.

Well, there's a new problem that I need a bit of experienced help with.

Her previous 'owner' {I use the term loosely because he was an abusive ****} said that she walks just fine on a lead, but she hasn't been walked in "like, forever".
Understatement .

I clipped a leach on her in the backyard and walked her around, just to see if she pulls on the lead, or hates walks, or whatever.
She heeled the entire way {without being asked}, sat when I stopped, and was an angel; the best dog I've ever walked.

Excellent, I think, we can now venture onto the street.

The instant, and I mean, the very SECOND we were out of sight of the house, she lunged forward, dragging me a good 10 metres, and when I'd recovered my balance, I planted my feet and tried to stop the pulling.
She strains forward as if she's trying desperatly to choke herself, pushing all her weight forward.
I did what I did to train my last rescue dog, and stopped completely, ordered her back to me, and to sit.

I didn't plan on moving until she did that, as she did it perfectly in the yard.

She looked back over her shoulder at me, then saw another dog across the road. She jumped forward, and scrabbled at the road, panting and barking, and trying to drag me along.
Snarling and barking and howling, trying to get at this other dog.

She will not listen to a word you say outside the house.
I spent four hours yesterday doing this:

Inside the house: "sit"
Responded with an instant sit.

Step outside the front door: "Sit"
Totally ignored me, wandered in a small circle, lay on her back, etc.

I can firmly say "Sit" until my face turns blue, push her butt down until my bones creak and refuse to move until the world comes to an end.
But it makes no difference...s he does not listen to me anymore than she would listen to the wind in the trees.

I'm stumped.

I've tried every trick in the book.
"No-pull" gentle leads, even.

so, senior dog owners, any advice?

She's going into Adult Obedience classes in three weeks.

Should I just keep her in the backyard until then?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2008, 09:29:01 am by EastJenn »

jesday

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Re: Oh wow I never expected THIS
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2008, 05:30:34 pm »
This is what our trainer taught when Syrus was being a brat. Similar to you he did well in a controlled environment,but once there were distractions, forget about it.

She said you have to keep him paying attention to you. That you are going to be a much better reward than anything else out there. It took awhile but finally worked. First start in back yard, garage, somewhere you have her attention with no outside distractions. Sit in front of her and say "Susie look." (insert dogs name)raise your hand and point your finger towards your eyes. The absolute millisecond she makes eye contact give her a yummy treat. She will probably avert your eyes at first as staring is very rude in dog language. Repeat these steps until she realizes a look for a treat. Then try to lengthen the time between her looking and getting he treat.

Once she has this down. Start walking around the yard with leash on. Stop every few feet and give command to look. Don't forget hand motion. She should stop and look waiting for her treat. Then start introducing distractions. Another person would be handy to do something off to the side and you make her continue to look at you until you say she can look away.  You get the idea. Keep adding things gradually. When you feel she is ready for outside walk, try her, but the moment she does not look at you when commanded back inside. Remember the hand signal and keep at it daily but not for more than ten minutes or so at a time.

Like I mentioned. It will take some time especially with a less than willing participant. But stubborn Syrus finally figured it out. He did notwant to look me in the eye. It was kind of funny actually. He'd glance real quick then move his whole head to the side. "I'm not looking."

Hope this helps get you started until training classes begin.

Offline ruffian

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Re: Oh wow I never expected THIS
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2008, 06:09:05 pm »
I have to be the bad guy and suggest a pinch collar. My 110 LB doberman hit the end of that leash once with the force of his body behind it once, just once in a pinch collar. He dropped like a rock into a lay-stay until I walked up to him and we proceeded in a civilized manner from then on.

I did the same thing with my Rottie who just WOULDN'T heel. Nothing bad about it. It's a tool, and if you need it, you need it.

Yep me too, it is a great training tool and does less damage to their throat than a choker.  I use them on my male Shiba, Tonka who is a horrible puller, and has never been able to be trained to stop, and Gage, who only needs it now when I have all 3 dogs or we are going into a situation where I NEED 100% control, festivals etc.


jesday

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Re: Oh wow I never expected THIS
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2008, 05:10:53 am »
I have to be the bad guy and suggest a pinch collar. My 110 LB doberman hit the end of that leash once with the force of his body behind it once, just once in a pinch collar. He dropped like a rock into a lay-stay until I walked up to him and we proceeded in a civilized manner from then on.

I did the same thing with my Rottie who just WOULDN'T heel. Nothing bad about it. It's a tool, and if you need it, you need it.
I agree with nothing bad about it - if it works. I used one on our Lab/Newfie mix, Bud. I swear that dog had not a nerve in his body. Even our trainer was scratching his head at the ineffectivenes s of it on him. We quite often referred to him as Bud Lite :D