Author Topic: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed  (Read 4015 times)

Offline ZooCrew

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BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« on: January 20, 2009, 01:52:28 pm »
I don't know if this was ever posted on here or not, but I thought this was a very interesting video.  Eye opening for some (although I already know of many problems pedigree dogs are having.......i n some cases, their future is grim). 

This video is almost an hour so set aside some time to watch.  There is some graphic video of brief surgical clips and debilitated dogs (brought me to tears).

Overall, I agree with all the points the video was making.  I only hope that some change is made before it is too late for some of our beloved breeds.

http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=44215931

Offline ruffian

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2009, 02:14:27 pm »
The KC's answer, of course nothing that has to do with health testing, but a start perhaps:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle5512620.ece

Valerie Elliott, Consumer Editor
The classic British bulldog, a symbol of defiance and pugnacity, is to disappear. A shake-up of breeding standards by the Kennel Club has signalled the end of the dog’s Churchillian jowl. Instead, the dog will have a shrunken face, a sunken nose, longer legs and a leaner body.
The change has angered the British Bulldog Breed Council and it is threatening legal action against the club. Robin Searle, the chairman, said: “What you’ll get is a completely different dog, not a British bulldog.”
New breeding standards for 209 dog species have been brought into immediate force after the furore over breeding practices shown on a BBC One documentary, Pedigree Dogs Exposed, last summer. Breeders have until the end of June to lodge any objections.
The shake-up comes as one of the country’s leading zoologists and animal behaviour experts, Sir Patrick Bateson, announced that he would be heading an independent inquiry into dog breeding.


The Kennel Club is determined to show its commitment to dog welfare and has ordered the removal of characteristic features from some dogs. In a statement it said: “The breed standards have been revised so they will not include anything that could in any way be interpreted as encouraging features that might prevent a dog breathing, walking and seeing freely.”


The shar pei will lose the familiar folds of skin on the neck, skull and legs while the Clumber spaniel and the labrador retriever must stay slim to qualify as top show dogs. Flat faces without a muzzle on Pekingese are also no longer acceptable because they cause breathing difficulties. Other breeds to change are the bloodhound, German shepherd hound, basset hound, Saint Bernard, chow chow, the Dogue de Bordeaux and mastiff.


Judges at licensed dog shows have been instructed to use the new breed standards and to choose only the healthiest and best-adjusted dogs when deciding champions. Those at Crufts are under orders to expel from the competition any animal that shows signs of disease or deformity. Incestuous breeding of dogs is also to be banned. Marc Abraham, veterinary adviser to the Kennel Club, said: “The changes will leave breeders and judges in no doubt about their responsibiliti es to safeguard the health and welfare of dogs, first and foremost.”



Bulldogs are prone to skin and coat problems, cherry eye, respiratory disorders, orthopaedic conditions, and soft or cleft palate. Most are born by Caesarean section because large heads and proportionally small hips make natural births difficult. The breed’s anatomy also hinders mating, with many litters conceived via artificial insemination.


Jemima Harrison, of Passionate Productions, which made Pedigree Dogs Exposed, said that the changes were “hugely welcome and long overdue” but that it would take years to put right all the problems.



Jenny Baker, chairwoman of the Shar Pei Society of Great Britain, also supported the changes. “We have never encouraged breeding of loose skin on the neck, legs or skull.”


Beverley Cuddy, Editor of Dogs Today magazine, was sceptical. “It sounds impressive but remember judges are also the breeders. It’s like asking shoplifters to police themselves. I don’t think there is a judge in the land brave enough to send a dog from the ring.”


Sir Patrick, president of the Zoological Society of London, said yesterday that he wished to appoint a small committee of experts, including a veterinary surgeon and a geneticist, to help his inquiry into breeding techniques. He will also review the registration and showing of dogs, and hopes to complete his report by the autumn. The Kennel Club has lodged a complaint about Pedigree Dogs Exposed with Ofcom, the broadcast regulator, accusing the documentary of bias.


Offline ZooCrew

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2009, 02:24:30 pm »
Well, I'm glad to see they are starting to take some action to reverse some of the cosmetic changes that have occured over the last hundred or more years.

But I think it will be met with alot of opposition.  Even if followed, I think it will take alot longer to reverse the changes than it took to cause the problems in the first place. 

But yes, it is a start.

Tonda

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2009, 03:39:05 am »
Haven't had a chance to watch this yet, but I've been VERY disturbed by what American breeders have done to the GSD over the past decade or so . . . those scrunched back legs are just awful. It looks like the dog was raised in a kennel that was too short for it to ever stand up.

Thanks for posting this.

Offline ruffian

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2009, 04:57:27 am »
It honestly doesnt matter what the gene pool holds as far as revering it, instead of breeding the bulldog with the widest shoulders breed the one with the narrowest, over time it will reverse.


Offline no.newf.ashley

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2009, 07:39:30 am »
I had watched this episode on t.v about a month ago, and wanted to share this but with my technically savy skills i couldn't locate a link to it, so the moment had passed.  I'm so happy to see this post! it is just so disheartening to see some of the animals in those states.  I specifically remember the Rhodesian ridgeback and thinking "why would they breed a dog like this knowing that its counterintuiti ve to the health of a dog."  I'm happy to hear they are starting to take some action.

AudgePadge

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2009, 07:58:49 am »
 :-\  This is just too sad...I don't even know what to say... the video of the Cavalier just killed me, and the boxer...  :'(

Offline ZooCrew

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2009, 09:46:06 am »
Yeah I know, some of those images were just heartbreaking.

What was kind of shocking to me is when they asked the judges on the basset and pug (I think?) regarding how they looked back in the day........... ......and they commented dogs that looked like that would never win today.  Why?  b/c they're not "to type"

With the changes that are going to be made in the UK, I wonder how long it will take to trickle into the US?  We certainly are no more less to blame than the UK.  Although it seems we do care a bit more on health screening..... ......it doesn't always mean healthy dogs are bred, or that unhealthy dogs are kept out of the show ring. 

Lyn

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Re: BBC Documentary--Pedigreed Dogs Exposed
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2009, 10:46:28 am »
Wow heartbreaking for sure.  :'( The Cav and the Boxer about did me in.  :'(

Look at Saints now a days. They are oversized, overdone and could never do the job they were bred to do. Heck they barely look like they can get up off the couch. :'(