Author Topic: dang! Now he's got mange...  (Read 5861 times)

Offline Heighway

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dang! Now he's got mange...
« on: November 10, 2005, 08:28:56 pm »
I took Webster in for neutering this morning.  That all went well and he is home now playing ruff and tumble, with us trying to keep him calm.  But, the vet pointed outs some hairloss around his eyes.  He said it was probably demodectic mange.  YUCK! So now he is on medicine for that.  He also has some pustule areas under is arms and groin areas, he is on antibiotics for that.  He also had ear infection and he is on medicine for that.  He doesn't seem to feel bad with any of this, but it is killing my pocketbook.  I got him microchipped, and the last of his vacs, skin scrapings,  neutered, ears deep cleaned and a ton of meds...All for just over $350.  Hopefully, all the meds will take and once we have a check up in 2 weeks, We won't have to go to the vet again for a year.
Karen

Offline shangrila

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2005, 08:34:51 pm »
Poor guy! I hope he feels better soon!

As far as your wallet goes, believe it or not you got a bargain if you got all that for $350
RIP former BPO

Offline jabear

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2005, 08:58:42 pm »
Poor Webster.  :( I know how hard it is to hear all of the terrible things going on with your baby but if it makes you feel better at all, Bear had mange as a pup too and has had yeast infections in his ears and groin area too. I think it is just part of having a big boy.  :-\  Also, when Bear got the mange he had it around his eye and on the hair by the nose. Maybe they are related?? And FYI- Bear made his first visit to the vet just for a routine "check up" for the first time at 2 years old. Up until then he was in for mange, ear infections, growing pains, & a bacterial infection.
And I agree with Heather too. Having all of that done and getting meds and only paying $350 is a great price!
Hugs,
Jaime
  Mom to one handsome black Bear.

Offline Kermit

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2005, 10:00:47 pm »
Yikes! Looks like I got out easy this morning for $80 at the vet!!

Zoot had demodectic mange as a pup too. It hasn't bothered him since, and he is 4 years old now. :)

Offline Heighway

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2005, 12:13:02 am »
Thanks for replying.  I just hate to tell folks he's got mange.  Sounds nasty, like having lice.   It's good to know all these beauties had it too.  Makes me feel like Websters going to be okay afterall. 
Karen

Offline newflvr

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2005, 12:14:29 am »
Of course, Webster is grand!!! He has you, doesn't he?  This is just a bump in the road!!! 

henrysmomma

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2005, 12:20:00 am »
aww, poor little guy. Hope he feels better soon.

Rose

Offline hugo~monster

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2005, 12:26:43 am »
i looked this up on the net.  i am sure the vet explained all this to you, but thought i would post in case others were unsure about demodectic mange. http://www.marvistavet.com/html/demodectic_mange.html  (the link where this can be found). 

(SOMETIMES CALLED "RED MANGE")

THE CULPRIT - DEMODEX CANIS
 
 
 
   
 Demodectic mange is caused by a microscopic mite called Demodex canis.  All dogs raised normally by their mothers possess this mite as mites are transferred from mother to pup via cuddling during the first few days of life.  (After the pup is older it is unable to pick up demodex mites. Puppies raised by hand, do not ever get demodex mites.)  For some reason, conditions change in certain dogs to allow demodex mites to "gain the upper hand;" the mites proliferate and can cause serious skin disease.

Mites are not transmitted to people or other dogs except from mother dog to pup as described. Demodectic mange (unlike Sarcoptic mange) is not contagious.
 
Mites live inside hair follicles -- a difficult place for miticides (chemicals that kill mites) to reach.
 
Mites are a normal residents of dog skin; it is only in some individual dogs that mites cause problems.
 
 
 
 DEMODICOSIS -- THE DISEASE ITSELF

Demodectic mange -- also called "demodicosis"-- has three forms:
 
 
 FORM #1: LOCALIZED

Usually a red, scaly, well-circumscribed lesion on the face or forelegs is present.  It generally goes away on its own.  Goodwinol ointment, an insecticide, may be used daily to control localized demodicosis. Hair regrowth should be evident after about a month of treatment; however, some localized cases appear "destined" to become generalized and no treatment will prevent this from occurring.

When ointment is used, rubbing the medication on the area may break off the weaker hairs at the margin of the lesion.  The lesion may thus appear to get larger at first. Antibacterial gels are also used against localized demodicosis and associated skin infections. Often it is best not to treat this condition and to simply allow it to resolve on its own.
 
   
 
 
 
 Enlarged lymph nodes are a bad sign -- often foretelling generalized mange.

CAN THE PUP BE BRED LATER?

Sometimes the puppy with localized demodicosis was obtained for breeding purposes. The current recommendation is not to treat these puppies so that we can determine if the condition will stay localized and resolve or if it will generalize. If it stays localized and eventually resolves without treatment, the animal is still a candidate for breeding. If the condition generalizes to cover the entire body, the animal should be sterilized. If the condition receives treatment and resolves, we will never know how the disease would have gone in its natural state and will not know whether the pup is carrying the genetic predisposition for demodectic mange. In this case, it is best to be conservative and not take the chance of passing on genetic predisposition for this disease.

Localized demodicosis is almost exclusively a "puppyhood" disease. When a puppy develops localized demodicosis the chance of the condition resolving is 90% unless there is a family history of demodicosis in related dogs. In this case, chance of spontaneous resolution drops to 50%.

Occasionally an adult dog develops localized demodicosis. We currently do not have good understanding of the prognosis or significance of this condition in an adult dog.

FORM #2: GENERALIZED

The entire dog is affected with patchy fur, skin infections, bald, scaly skin.

Most generalized demodicosis starts as localized demodicosis.
 
 
 
   
 ADULT ONSET-- Most demodicosis occurs in young dogs.  An older dog should not
get deodicosis unless it has an underlying problem with its immune system, possibly even cancer.  A veterinarian should be consulted regarding possible primary diseases.

JUVENILE ONSET -- 30-50% of dogs under age 1 year recover spontaneously from generalized demodicosis without any form of treatment. Usually treatment is recommended, though, to facilitate recovery.
 
 
 
 IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT DOGS WITH A HISTORY OF GENERALIZED
DEMODECTIC MANGE NOT BE BRED AS THERE IS A HEREDITARY
COMPONENT TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE DISEASE
 
 
 FORM #3: DEMODECTIC PODODERMATITIS
 
 
 This condition represents demodectic mange confined to the paws.  Bacterial infectious usually accompany this condition.  Often as generalized demodicosis is treated, the foot is the last stronghold of the mite.  Old English Sheepdogs and Shar-peis tend to get severe forms of this condition. The infection can be so deep that biopsy is needed to find the mites and make the diagnosis.
 
   
 
 
 
 STRESS AND GENERALIZED DEMODECTIC MANGE

Physiological stress is an important factor determining the degree of severity of  demodectic mange.

Females should be spayed as soon as the disease is controlled. Coming into heat, hormone fluxes, and pregnancy are very stressful.  Also, predisposition to demodicosis is hereditary and should not be passed on.
 
The dog should be fed a reputable brand of dog food so as to avoid any nutritionally related problems.
 
Keep the pet parasite-free.  Worms are irritants that the pet need not deal with and fleas may exacerbate the itchiness and skin infection.
 
Keep up the pet's vaccinations.
 
The mites themselves cause suppression of the immune system so the pet needs every advantage to stay healthy.
 
Skin infections are usually present in these cases and antibiotics will likely be necessary. It is very important that cortisone type medications such as prednisone NOT be used in these cases as they will tip the immune balance in favor of the mite.
PROGNOSIS

The younger the dog, the better the chance of cure.  In many cases of adult-onset demodicosis, the disease is controlled by dips and baths but cure is not always possible.  Some cases can never be controlled.

CURRENT TREATMENT OF CHOICE -- IVERMECTIN

Ivermectin is a broad spectrum anti-parasite medication generally used for food animals and horses.  It is licensed for use in dogs and cats as a heartworm preventive and as a topical ear mite therapy at this time thus the use of this medication to treat demodicosis is not approved by the FDA. When ivermectin was a new drug it was hoped that it could be used against demodectic mange mites. At first it was found ineffective but later it was determined that daily doses are needed (most other parasites can be controlled with wormings spaced several weeks apart.) Ivermectin is inexpensive relative to Milbemycin (see below) and involves no labor intensive bathing. It DOES, however, taste terrible if given orally (it may be necessary for the owner to learn how to give ivermectin as an injectable treatment.)
 
~SHELLIE & HUGO~

Offline hugo~monster

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2005, 12:28:02 am »
also meant to add that i hope your beautiful baby is feeling a-ok realy soon!!! :)
~SHELLIE & HUGO~

Kiahpyr

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2005, 10:23:08 am »
Poor baby!! Hope he feels better soon. :)

Offline Fumble

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2005, 07:32:31 pm »
oooh i hope that webster feels bettER! fumble has had a yeast infection in his ear and an upper respiratory infection!  and i'm sure that there are much more to come!  but i really hope that you're little guy is feeling better!
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Offline Heighway

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2005, 09:16:46 pm »
thanks everyone.  Webster seems to be none the worse for wear.  He still plays hard!  Surgery seems to be healing well.  Ears don't smell.  But he still has hairless eye rims.  Hope the meds takes care of that soon.
Karen

Offline luvmenewfs

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Re: dang! Now he's got mange...
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2005, 06:20:47 am »
Hey I just caught this...Sorry if I'm too late...
Demoditic is not contagious.
You can actually assist by boosting the immune system.  When a Dog's immune system is down and out...other situations take place. 

You may want to just look into some good supplements like Vitamin E and such to help the immune sytem.  Some good herbal doggy products exist for immune system too.  It may help clear it up faster.

Sorry to hear of the woes.  We deal with this quite often with our rescued fellow.  His immune system is not always in balance and it always show up throug his skin.  He's very sensitive, so when he is stressed, it shows up through his skin because the stress (this mean a simple change in our habits, like I said, he's very sensitive) can cause the immune system to straggle.

Luvmenewfs.