Author Topic: Combatting passive resistance  (Read 4352 times)

Offline brandon

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Combatting passive resistance
« on: January 04, 2006, 04:31:09 pm »
Ok, when Bava decides he doesnt want to do something or go somewhere, he lays down.  Two examples, taking him out to pee , when we are coming back into the house occasionally he will jump into this low lying bushy area close to the front door, and lay down in it, refuses to get up, no matter what.  If I go to pick him up he will roll on his back and go into crazy dog play mode.  He did it this weekend, while we were doing some exploring closed to the water, he wanted to get in sooo bad, but we had other places to go and couldn't have him muddy / wet with us, so he lays down in the dirt of course walking back out and pouts, and I reach down to pull him up he rolls on his back starts mouthing and kicking his muddy paws, being a big old goof.

If her were a smaller dog, I'd just pull him up by his collar, but not when they're this big, it would probably hurt his throat.  We've started making him wear a harness again, so that would help if this happens when he has it on, but I'm sure he won't have his harness on next time this happens, it never works out that way. 

It was kind of a cute behavior, and it's probably part of growing up learning the word "no", but it's more of a pain as he gets heavier (he is 90lbs now)

Any ideas?

« Last Edit: January 04, 2006, 04:31:36 pm by brandon »
“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”

Offline brandon

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2006, 04:38:40 pm »
Should mention, the main problem is trying to get him to stand up is like wrestling a muddy pig, crazy nut dog.
“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”

Offline mastiffmommy

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2006, 04:42:11 pm »
hahaha poor Bava wants to play and mean old you dont  ;D

I have had similar situations, and like you said, you just dont tote away a giant dog lol. What I have found works is if you get as goofy as he, or better yet goofier  ::) :P

Take a step back, jump, clap your hands have a silly voice and tell him how much fun its going to be when he gets to you. Most likely he is up and thinking you are the funniest thing ever by now, and you treat and tell him what a good boy he is.

Okay, anyone who is with you and not a dog, might pretend not to know you, but hey.... lol thats the beauty of having dogs lol  ;D

Hope this helps and Good luck and let us know if Mr. Bava decides to be a mule again lol

Marit
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2006, 04:49:32 pm »
hahaha poor Bava wants to play and mean old you dont ;D

I have had similar situations, and like you said, you just dont tote away a giant dog lol. What I have found works is if you get as goofy as he, or better yet goofier ::) :P

Take a step back, jump, clap your hands have a silly voice and tell him how much fun its going to be when he gets to you. Most likely he is up and thinking you are the funniest thing ever by now, and you treat and tell him what a good boy he is.

Okay, anyone who is with you and not a dog, might pretend not to know you, but hey.... lol thats the beauty of having dogs lol ;D

Hope this helps and Good luck and let us know if Mr. Bava decides to be a mule again lol

Marit

I have the same problem with shakes sometimes and i do exactly what you do.  my new problem is that he sees through it now!!!  if i am trying to get him inside no matter how goofy and fun i look, he jsut wont budge!!!

Offline GrumpyBunny

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2006, 04:51:21 pm »
Marit, I totally agree...

Brandon, Ranger goes all flopsy like that sometimes too.  I have actually found that doing exactly what Marit said works.  I just take a couple steps back and call him to me.  He usually pops right up.

Of course, Ranger is more "mature" than Bava (YEAH, RIGHT!), so I usually don't have to go overboard with the silliness, but I do make it fun and exciting for him when he gets to me.  You might have to really make a fool of yourself, but it does work!
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Offline brandon

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2006, 04:54:32 pm »
What Kirsten Said!

The being silly worked the first couple of times :)  He's like nope, not gonna do it, I know you're going to not let me get in the water or make me go inside, etc.. He's got me trained real well I guess. 
I'll try and play more with him when he stands up next time.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2006, 04:56:11 pm by brandon »
“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”

Offline nostaw

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2006, 01:15:37 pm »
Welcome to the wonderful world of Newfoundlands, passive resistance is their speciality, be it, I don't want to go in, I dont want to get in the car, I dont want to move. I've had to lift bell onto her feet, lift her into the Landrover and push doors open with her laid behind them, all because she won't move. Bell now responds to "shift your bum" we've said it so often.

Once you get her out of this habit Bava will no doubt start on the "Chase Me" phase. She knows the command, come, but rather than do it she'll just look at you as if she doesn't understand and run if you come near.

The only counter I've found so far is "Scooby Snack" I go straight for a Newfs basic urge, Food. a pocket full of Gravy Bones usually does the trick. Both Bell and Hovis come to me immediately when I produce a gravy bone, but they will not get it until they are sat in front of me and I've put their leads on. That way I have control and we're back to basic lead work where a gentle tug is all that's required.

Andy Bell & Hovis
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Offline newflvr

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2006, 01:35:21 pm »
Yep!  Food!!! That's what works with Chester as well.  Cowboy, other than his health issues  :P, is the most perfect Newf.  Does whatever I suggest at first go. 

Chester on the hand is master of 'limp-dog'.  If I need him to get in to the car, he becomes a 'Hershey bar':  all melting brown Newf.  If I pull on him, it's like grabbing melting chocolate.  I tried running the opposite direction all excited and generally making a full fool of self  and he learned that trick within days.  If I have a treat in my hand, on the other hand, he's ever so co-operative!  I guess the secret is to have treats available at all times! ;D

Offline my3dogs

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2006, 02:00:48 pm »
Oh yea....Passive resistance rules for Daisy....aka Gandhi.   
She doesn't go for the play thing.  She used to.....but not any more.
She just flops....she's like a puddle of brown fur that used to be a dog.   She's butter.   
Food doesn't work.   Not even one of her favorites..... .cheese....tha t's right....the power of cheese fails. 
We resort to preying on her weakness.  She doesn't like to be left alone.   When she doesn't want to go inside.  We go in and turn out the lights.   She high tails it pretty quickly.   Of course, this wouldn't work at a public park.   
She doesn't like to get in the car but she will if Jack or Jilly is already in there.....so Jack/Jill have gone on numerous rides to the vet.   
Also if I can get her running while holding her collar and run her toward the car....a running start then 50% of the time she leaps in.
Luckily coming home is not a problem.  She always is anxious to get into the car to come back home.

Maybe Triple A should offer coverage for something like this.

"Hello? Triple A? Yes...I'm stuck at the park and Gandhi won't get in the car. Yes..he weighs over 100lbs. Can you send a fork lift over? 20 minutes? Yep that will be fine. Thanks!"


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Offline greek4

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2006, 03:08:22 pm »
Rocco tries really hard to hold his ground.  The poor guy is so easily distracted and has such awful short term memory, that I can fool him into doing just about anything.  A little food, intimidation, and distraction go a long way, except when he gets out and runs for freedom.  The only thing that works then is to patiently follow him, do the reach and miss a few times, some tears, curse words and eventually he gets distracted by a neighbor, a pile of poop, a duck, anything and I can snag him.  We have only gone through this torture a handful of times and not once since we moved.

Thanks,

Emily and 1 husband, 1 boy, 1 on the way, and 4 crazy dogs

Offline my3dogs

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2006, 03:13:42 pm »
Bava zoomed out of the house the other day ahead of Brandon and right past me as I was coming in and ran like a nut away from us as we chased him. I said to myself, okay, watch this you little turd.....

I went to the car which he was standing near and said *I* am going for a ride (which he LOVES) and opened the door. Bingo! He ran to the car and I was able to take his collar. I'll try the treats when we're trying to get him OUT of the car.

woohooo....... Score 1 for mom!!!!
"As long as the world is turning and spinning, we're gonna be dizzy and we're gonna make mistakes." - Mel Brooks
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Offline chaos270

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Re: Combatting passive resistance
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2006, 11:27:42 pm »
             Kali does the I'm not moving thing especially on the other side of doors including the one everyone uses to get in the house if you push hard enough you can open it enough to squeeze through.  I generally help her up anyways because of the slippery floors and she hasn't pulled the floor trick anywhere public yet.  She does the playfighting thing on her back when it's grooming time or when she's in psycho play mode.  She latches on to unsuspecting pant legs or shoelaces.  But by far her favorite trick is barking in your ear.
       As for getting in the car she usually jumps in cause she loves car rides unless she's tired where she puts her front feet in and turns around and looks at you to pick up her butt.  And she never lets you catch her half the time.....car keys or a favorite toy go a long way.
Erin and the critters
Kali ~ the newf
Lacey ~ the aussie 
Gabby ~ Holsteiner mare
Fire ~ Appendix Quarter Horse/Belgian gelding
Lilah and Hannah ~ Kali's kitties